August 22, 2014
  • Jedi: May the force be with you
  • Catholic Jedi: And also with you
August 21, 2014

catsbeaversandducks:

Oliver the Dog and Arashi the Cat: the cutest best friends ever!

Photos by ©izumiechan - Via BuzzFeed

(via yantantether)

August 20, 2014
August 19, 2014
August 18, 2014

catsbeaversandducks:

Having some “me time” is very important in order to keep you relaxed and confident in yourself.

Photos via Photogenic Felines

(via thedustatdawn)

August 17, 2014
August 16, 2014
fuckyeahfelines:

Tomorrow is Black Cat Appreciation Day!  Black cats are often passed over in shelters and rescues because of an irrational superstition of them.  The reality is that they are some of the most affectionate, calm and sweet pussycats on the planet.  Their temperaments make them lovely companions.If you have room in your home for a companion - please consider adopting a black cat today.(submitted by vanessasarges)

fuckyeahfelines:

Tomorrow is Black Cat Appreciation Day!  Black cats are often passed over in shelters and rescues because of an irrational superstition of them.  The reality is that they are some of the most affectionate, calm and sweet pussycats on the planet.  Their temperaments make them lovely companions.
If you have room in your home for a companion - please consider adopting a black cat today.

(submitted by vanessasarges)

August 5, 2014

drivebyknitting:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

ckate2011:

fatfemmefeminist:

conversacult:

Princesas da Disney plus size, pois como diz o rei Roberto Carlos: “Quem foi que disse que tem que ser magra para ser gostosa?”

i am IN LOVE WITH THESE

CANNOT HANDLE THESE.

THIS IS SO DAMN CUTE I LOVE IT :D

These are cute, but the hands (or lack there of) are a bit off-putting.

(via calliotrope)

August 4, 2014

lovelylavenderchild:

You cannot be racist to white people

just like you can’t fire your boss

because you don’t have that power

(via manhatingbabyeater)

August 3, 2014

seananmcguire:

Please remember that sometimes silence on an issue or situation isn’t a lack of caring or concern: it’s a form of exhausted self-care as people pull back and try to put themselves back together.  Just because I don’t say something about everything doesn’t mean I don’t think it matters.  It may mean that I am completely drained from all the things I’m already dealing with, and cannot safely take on another battle.

The same goes for absolutely everyone.  Anger is sometimes quiet and sad and silent, because anything else is just beyond you.

(via calliotrope)

lesbianvenom:

there’s something really interesting in this passage that I wanted to point out Trelawney assumes that Harry was born in midwinter because of his “dark hair” and “mean stature” and “tragic losses so young in life” Tom Riddle was born in midwinter, is describe in CoS as resembling Harry, and his mother died right after his birth Harry has a piece of Voldemort’s soul in him that’s why Trelawney made that assumption

lesbianvenom:

there’s something really interesting in this passage that I wanted to point out
Trelawney assumes that Harry was born in midwinter because of his “dark hair” and “mean stature” and “tragic losses so young in life”
Tom Riddle was born in midwinter, is describe in CoS as resembling Harry, and his mother died right after his birth
Harry has a piece of Voldemort’s soul in him
that’s why Trelawney made that assumption

(via warblersarelove)

Low-income people are often criticised for making ‘poor decisions’ in the eyes of observers who think they have a better understanding of how poor people should live their lives, prioritise their spending, and live within their own communities. Yet, these criticisms are often made with a lack of understanding about how income levels influence decisionmaking, and how certain habits can become ingrained even after years; if you have lived with insecurity at some point, you are likely to continue to retain habits that reflect the experience of financial insecurity, even if those habits are actually detrimental to saving money, developing more independence, and living securely.

The thing about being poor is that it requires a radically different approach to life, and one that often doesn’t involve a long-term view, because you can’t afford to take such a view. When poor people are criticised for ‘bad decisions,’ it’s often for things like not buying in bulk (the econopack problem rides again), not renting more affordable housing (yes, because people choose to live in expensive rentals), not buying things that are more expensive in the short term but pay off in the long term (‘why keep buying crappy $20 shoes when you could buy a $100 pair of long-lasting shoes?’). So many of these judgments involve how poor people use their money, and they betray a fundamental lack of understanding about some basic facts of being poor.

When you are poor, you do not have savings, money in reserve, or a safety cushion in your bank account. It’s not that you’re being cheap and refusing to buy those $100 shoes, it’s that you have $35 in your bank account until next pay day, and your child needs shoes today. You don’t have access to credit, and if you did and chose to put those better shoes on a credit card, you wouldn’t be able to pay them off anyway, because most of your next paycheque is already allocated to expenses like rent and utilities that must be paid immediately (and in some cases are overdue).

When you are poor, there is no safety net, and this is something many middle class people do not understand. They confuse broke and poor, and don’t understand the genuine difference between their way of life and that of others. Those who retain cushions of hundreds or thousands of dollars start getting nervous about ‘not having enough money’ when they still have more in their accounts than poor people make in a month—and while one might argue that savings and maintaining such cushions is an example of good financial planning and a good idea, it’s only accessible to people who make enough money to do it.

And who have trained themselves to have the habit of doing it. One of the facts of poverty is that you become accustomed to spending money when you have it, and it becomes hard to check your spending habits in the unlikely event you do start making more money; consequently, it becomes very hard to save money, or to use your funds on practical things. Thus, a poor person might buy something like a television instead of bulk foods for the pantry, attracting disdain from critics, simply because she wants a television, and she has the money. Next month, when her income fluctuates and an emergency eats up her extra cash, she’s right back where she started, but at least she still has that television (for now, until she’s forced to sell it to pay the water bill three months in the future).

Decision making is complicated when you’re poor, and you have a very different rubric for decisions that other members of society do. Being poor isn’t mysterious and noble, but it’s not the fault of people who are poor, either; and it’s not necessarily something that people can magic their way out of just by making ‘the right choices’ as deemed by other members of society.

Decision making while poor can involve being forced to choose between two important expenses with the knowledge that you can only cover one. Food or electricity? Rent or garbage bill? Water or phone? Copay for the doctor’s office or transit pass so you can get to work? Car insurance or parking tickets? While many people are familiar with constant demands on their finances, people in the middle classes can generally handle these needs routinely as they come up; pay it off, move forward, maybe shift the budget around a little to accommodate unexpected expenses. When you are poor, even five dollars more or less can make a huge difference in your life.

The role that poverty plays as a looming shadow in the lives of many people is often discounted. To be poor is to make decisions solely on the basis of money, sometimes in the active knowledge that they are bad decisions but that they are also the only choice; this raises questions about the nature of whether they are truly decisions, or could be more accurately termed forced sacrificial moves. And to have been poor is to fear poverty again, to attempt to pull yourself out of harmful set habits that you recognise, but don’t necessarily know how to address, because you’ve never known anything but finance-induced decision making.

Is the money there? Spend it, quickly, before it slips away. Address immediate needs as they arise, because everything is a right-now crisis, and try not to think about the future. If the car breaks down, hope that it’s an easy fix, because the thought of buying a new one is insurmountable right now. If you can’t fix it, buy another old clunker even though you know it’ll break down too, because it’s all you can afford. Or search for a new job that will let you take transit, and hope that you don’t end up short on bus fare at the end of the month in that awkward period when all the money’s gone out and nothing has come in yet.

August 2, 2014

lunarobverse:

A brilliant metaphor

(via copperbooom)